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Three Twitter Resources for Everyone

Geoff Wood

In the rapidly developing world of microblogging it can be difficult to keep up with the technology. For new users, it's even harder to figure out where to begin.
With that thought in mind, I put together the following quick list of resources for everyone to keep handy:
This Q & A-style resource is assembled and published by Jeremiah Owyang, a researcher with Forrester who specializes in Social Media. Jeremiah covers the basics and provides great answers that any new Twitter user will ask at some point; from tweet etiquette to defining platform slang to Twitter's place amongst a firm's marketing strategy mix.
As Twitter moves into the mainstream, it's logical that industrious people will look for ways to get more out of the platform than conversation and status updates. This has been accomplished through the development of analytic tools to monitor and extract useful information from both individual users and the aggregate Twitter Stream. New tools are being developed daily but this resource recommends eight excellent ones that you can use to make the most of your Twitter experience right now. Be sure to check the comments below the post, as well, for ideas on other tools and applications that will prove useful.
Twitter has evolved its own categorizing system through the use of the hashtag (#) character. This system is quite useful, allowing users to easily narrow down the aggregate Twitter Stream to focus on a specific topic. However, the topic names themselves often come from abbreviations and acronyms and can be hard to find if you're an outsider looking in. Enter, What the Hashtag?! a wiki-style resources that automatically catalogs trending topics as well as allows users to manually enter their own. If you're looking to find Tweets on a specific topic start here to see if a hashtag has been created then find other Tweets on that topic through Twitter search (http://search.twitter.com) or the integrated stream housed on the hashtag's page. It has cataloged more than 940 hashtags already and will perpetually grow.